Tools & Tips

Future of Work – Initiatives at O*NET Resource Center

There is a great deal of interest in changing technological, social, and environmental factors and the effect they may have on the future of work. In all likelihood, in the future, new types of jobs will be added, some existing jobs will be lost, and the nature of work in other jobs will change.

For a listing of related studies and articles, see Future of Work: Bibliography of Papers. 1 This listing is developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment & Training Administration. Last updated February 2022.

Future automation is the focus of many of these studies. Various researchers around the world are examining the potential for automation to impact the world of work using different assumptions and approaches. A number of them use O*NET data on occupational tasks, work activities, and other descriptors as one input.

One research approach developed automation probability levels that group occupations with a similar predicted probability of having parts of the job (such as certain tasks) transition to computer-controlled equipment or software in the next 20 years. These levels serve as one source of information to consider for individuals interested in workforce related research, long-term economic planning, education, program development, or worker preparedness initiatives.

Occupations are grouped into three automation levels:

  • High — These occupations are in the upper quartile of automation probability.
  • Medium — These occupations are in the third quartile of automation probability.
  • Low — These occupations are in the bottom half of automation probability.

The automation level information displayed on those linked pages is developed and maintained by Burning Glass Technologies: Labor Insight external site. Labor Insight’s “Risk of Automation Scores” are based on the seminal Oxford University study on automation, The Future of Employment: How Susceptible are Jobs to Computerisation? external siteThat study leveraged O*NET information to assign probability scores to a listing of occupations. Burning Glass Technologies updated and enhanced the study’s initial analysis based on its more granular understanding of skills and occupations. Burning Glass Technologies uses up-to-date, incoming transactional data, as well as O*NET information, to maintain the currency of the automation probability scores.

Source: Additional Initiatives at O*NET Resource Center

Related posts

Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean – Most in-demand occupations and emerging skills

The third issue of The Future of Work in Latin America and the Caribbean series combines new and traditional labor market data sources to understand what are the most in-demand occupations and skills in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Using LinkedIn data, we introduce “the Labor Market GPS”, a tool aimed at helping workers transition from … Continue reading

Future of Work – Challenges and opportunities for social partners and labour institutions

The profound change sweeping through the world of work involves four major drivers: technological innovation, demographic shifts, climate change and globalization. It poses serious challenges, but also opens new opportunities for social dialogue and the role of the social partners, together with public authorities, in the governance of the world of work. While social dialogue … Continue reading

Future of Work – New skills, but which ones?

To future-proof citizens’ ability to work, they will require new skills—but which ones? A survey of 18,000 people in 15 countries suggests those that governments may wish to prioritize. Some work will, of course, be specialized. But in a labor market that is more automated, digital, and dynamic, all citizens will benefit from having a … Continue reading

The Future of Work – A ‘double-disruption’ scenario for workers

The COVID-19 pandemic-induced lockdowns and related global recession of 2020 have created a highly uncertain outlook for the labour market and accelerated the arrival of the future of work. The Future of Jobs Report 2020 aims to shed light on: 1) the pandemic-related disruptions thus far in 2020, contextualized within a longer history of economic … Continue reading

Future of Work – The roles of higher education, further education and lifelong learning

There are five major issues that confront the development of economies, in particular, labour markets. These are the climate crisis, economic globalisation, the advent of new technologies, low wage work and underlying these issues, inequality. How we view them will determine the kinds of knowledge and skills needed to provide paid workers with good jobs. … Continue reading

Future of Work and AI – Technology will disrupt labor markets by 2030, displacing millions but creating new opportunities

An in-depth analysis of the US, Germany, and Australia shows how technology will disrupt labor markets by 2030—displacing millions of workers but creating new opportunities as well. Looking at all of these factors gave us an aggregate impact of automation and economic growth on national workforces by 2030. Two economic forecasts, and three possible technology … Continue reading

Future of Work Global Survey 2021 – 82% of employers plan to hire this year

There’s no downplaying the fact that the coronavirus pandemic has had an impact on the world of work, from the tools and methods employers use to hire and train candidates, to new policies around remote work and flexibility, to a redefined concept of what it actually means to find “the right fit” between candidates and … Continue reading

Future of Work – Leveraging human potential : The World Economic Forum’s Report 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic-induced lockdowns and related global recession of 2020 have created a highly uncertain outlook for the labour market and accelerated the arrival of the future of work. The Future of Jobs Report 2020 aims to shed light on: 1) the pandemic-related disruptions thus far in 2020, contextualized within a longer history of economic … Continue reading

Future of Work in Canada – Enhance the adaptation of the labour force

Achievement of a decent level of growth in Canadian per-capita incomes in the years ahead depends crucially on an increase in the number of hours worked relative to the size of our population—and even more importantly on the quality of output from each of those hours. Like a steady drip, Canada’s labour force participation rate … Continue reading

Future of Work in BC – Options for building a resilient labour force

With the rapid growth of automation and technological advancement, the skills and competencies required across British Columbia’s economic development regions are evolving. As the province shifts towards a more digital, knowledge-based economy, it is important to consider the development of BC’s labour force. While there are a number of initiatives targeting the next generation of … Continue reading

Skills and the Future of Work – Forecasts of extremely rapid change are not based on empirical record

In this paper, existing evidence on levels of job skill requirements is examined to provide an understanding of historical trends and current levels. It also provides a frame of reference for evaluating predictions regarding future changes in job skill requirements. High levels of inequality accompanied by changes in technology, employment relations, and the global division … Continue reading

Future of Work in Ireland – Six groups with the largest number of persons employed whose jobs were at high risk of automation

The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered a seismic change in the way in which the labour market operates globally, with the fundamental relationship between the workplace and the workforce likely to be changed on a long-lasting basis. The future world of work, in particular at occupational level, should see a continued embracing of practices being utilised recently … Continue reading

Population Ageing – Alternative measures of dependency and implications for the future of work

The world’s population is getting older, a phenomenon that has important implications for the future of work. Persons aged 55 years and over are expected to outnumber all children aged 0 to 14 years by 2035 and the entire child and youth population aged 0 to 24 years by 2080. As a direct consequence of … Continue reading

COVID and the Future of Work – Transforming our work, workforce, and workplace

The trends around future of work are leading to an unleashed organization, connected on digital platforms, and able to work anywhere at anytime. These changes are impacting all industries as advances in technology fundamentally change the work itself, who does the work, and where it needs to be done. An organization with a Future of … Continue reading

Future of Work – Towards a skills-based, rather than degree-based labour market

The rise of tech is currently transforming the labour market, leading to the automation of some jobs and tasks on the one hand and the emergence of new kinds on the other. Proactively preparing for this new reality requires an in-depth, granular understanding of these changes and their impact on jobs and employment. LinkedIn data … Continue reading

Future of Work – What are the prospects for improving the lot of US workers?

What are the prospects for improving the lot of US workers in the 21st century? This introduction to the topic examines the most important US labor market trends of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, considers their causes and likely future trends; and then explores policies that might improve these outcomes. The most important … Continue reading

Future of Work in Europe – impact of global developments on skills demand in the ETF’s partner countries

The objective of this Issues Paper is to analyse the impact of global developments on skills demand in the ETF’s partner countries and discuss implications for policy reforms to manage the transition of education, training and lifelong learning systems of the future. A team of international and national experts contributed to the paper by (i) … Continue reading

Education and the Future of Work – 21st century skills in curricula

“Holistic development” is the watchword when setting educational goals for students. However, what this means in practice differs from country to country and culture to culture. The underlying sentiments, though, are similar: We all want to ensure that our young citizens are equipped to think critically and creatively, and to solve problems in an increasing … Continue reading

The future of Work in Turkey – Average levels of automation are 20 to 25 percent by 2030

A new report, Future of work: Turkey’s talent transformation in the digital era, dives deeper on the issues. It examines the impact of productivity growth driven by automation, AI, and digital technologies on different sectors and occupations. It also addresses the opportunities that will emerge to transform Turkey’s talent marketplace and the challenges that the … Continue reading

Future of Work and Skills in Canada – Countries around the world are positioning themselves

The future of skills has become a subject of global debate. So far, most of the attention from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the World Economic Forum (WEF), major management consulting firms, think tanks and banks has fallen onto reports warning about occupations most at risk of automation, the number of jobs … Continue reading

Future of Work – Demand for both “digital” and “human” factors is driving growth

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is creating demand for millions of new jobs, with vast new opportunities for fulfilling people’s potential and aspirations. However, in order to turn these opportunities into reality, new sources of data and innovative approaches to understand emerging jobs and skills, as well as to empower effective and coordinated large-scale action are … Continue reading

Future of Work – Five stereotypical claims that are often advanced in debates

In this comprehensive but readable commentary, our Director Jim Stanford challenges five stereotypical claims that are often advanced in debates over the future of work: Work is not disappearing; it can’t. Technology is not accelerating. “Gigs” aren’t even new. Technology is often more about relationships than productivity. Skills are not a magic bullet. On #5: … Continue reading

The future of Work – The new social contract in the 21st century

In a report, The social contract in the 21st century: Outcomes so far for workers, consumers, and savers in advanced economies, the McKinsey Global Institute takes an in-depth look at changes in 22 advanced economies in Asia, Europe, and North America, covering 57 percent of global GDP. Among the findings: while opportunities for work have … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Differences in robotization across industries and countries

Akamatsu’s “flying geese” paradigm describes this shifting international division of labor based on dynamic comparative advantage. American, European, and Japanese firms moved a lot of their production to developing Asia and Latin America, first helping countries like Malaysia and Chile, then others like China and Mexico, and then others like Vietnam and Bangladesh. Lower-wage countries … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Three challenges and a government blueprint

Digital and artificial intelligence technologies will likely have a substantial economic and social impact. Governments can act now to create shared prosperity and better lives for all citizens. Three challenges While automation has the potential to boost economic growth, it poses some key challenges to the nature of work. The public senses this shift. In … Continue reading

Future of Work – The challenge is not that they create too few jobs, but rather that too few workers have the skills

The challenge that all new technologies pose is not that they create too few jobs, but rather that too few workers have the skills to fill them. Just as some jobs benefit from the new technologies, while others become obsolete, so, too, some skills become more valuable, while others are substitutable. The automobile boosted the … Continue reading

Future of work – How it sidelines worker voices

This blind spot that exists toward these vulnerable workers reflects in part the long-run erosion of worker power and the precipitous decline in the reach of unions, rising inequality, the fissuring of the workplace, and the impact of globalization and technology on the “hollowing out” of the job market. Many workers who hold jobs most … Continue reading

Future of Work – 18 to 34 hold almost 40% of the US jobs that could disappear in the next decade

With each passing year, parents are getting more worried about how their children will fare once it’s time to take that step from school to the workforce. They have good reason to fret. Some 17 million Americans under age 30—about one third of the under-30 population—are saddled with student debt. Many are worried about their … Continue reading

Future of Work and Mega Trends – How do you feel about them ?

Technological breakthroughs Rapid advances in technological innovation Automation, robotics and AI are advancing quickly, dramatically changing the nature and number of jobs available. Technology has the power to improve our lives, raising productivity, living standards and average life span, and free people to focus on personal fulfilment. But it also brings the threat of social … Continue reading

Future of Work in US – Regional innovation hubs

Artificial intelligence andemerging technologies have enabled automation to scale and pose legitimate workforce threats. However, these innovations are creating new jobs and recreating old ones that together shape the building blocks of a future workforce. This dynamic opportunity engine is driven in large part by a fast expanding innovation ecosystem that combines a bevy of … Continue reading

The Geography of the Future of Work in US – A mosaic of local economies on diverging trajectories

A new report from the McKinsey Global Institute, The future of work in America: People and places, today and tomorrow (PDF–4.41MB), analyzes more than 3,000 US counties and 315 cities and finds they are on sharply different paths. Automation is not happening in a vacuum, and the health of local economies today will affect their … Continue reading

Future of Work – We should teach skills and not (just) knowledge

The publication presents three highly specific alternative visions of the future and potential options for action. It wants to make a contribution to the general debate on the future of work and make findings of the project more accessible and better-known; and above all to focus attention on both the long-term and global perspectives. To … Continue reading

Future of Work – Computerization of white collar jobs

For centuries, advances in labor-saving technology have been met with fear that such technology will eliminate jobs. In the computer era, seminal work by Autor, Levy, and Murnane (2003) clarified that certain jobs are most at risk from technology, in particular so-called routine jobs which are made up of tasks most easily substituted for by … Continue reading

The Future of Work and Skills – The case of the South Eastern Europe and Turkey (SEET), Eastern Partnership (EaP), Southern and Eastern Mediterranean (SEMED) and Central Asia

The objective of this Issues Paper is to analyse the impact of global developments on skills demand in the ETF’s partner countries and discuss implications for policy reforms to manage the transition of education, training and lifelong learning systems of the future. A team of international and national experts contributed to the paper by (i) … Continue reading

The Future of Work and Skills Acquisition – A shift in mindset is needed

With rapid changes—both technological and in the organization of work—this new study finds that workers are extremely concerned about the profound impact of technologcal changes in their jobs (and whether they will even have a job in the future), with two-thirds of respondents seeing their job changing significantly at least every five years because of … Continue reading

Future of Work and Anxiety in Canada – Who is fearful of automation ?

Who is fearful of automation and what do they want politicians to do about it? This paper finds a correlation between Canadians’ fear of job losses from automation and populist and nativist views—but also that Canadians favour traditional government policy approaches to job disruption, such as retraining, more than radical measures such as reducing immigration. … Continue reading

Future of Work – Voices of Youth

What are young people’s hopes and vision for the Future of Work? Students from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, in Geneva, share their thoughts. Chosen excerpts by Job Market Monitor. Read the whole story at  International Youth Day: Voices of Youth on the Future of Work

Future of Work – The macroeconomic consequences of digitalization

Computing power continues to grow at an enormous rate. Simultaneously, more and better data is increasingly available and Machine Learning methods have seen significant breakthroughs in the recent past. All this pushes further the boundary of what machines can do. Nowadays increasingly complex tasks are automatable at a precision which seemed infeasible only few years … Continue reading

Future of Work in UK – The demographic changes

The Youth Commission aims to find ways to improve education and employment opportunities for England’s 16-24-year olds. Its first report identified five key challenges: • Better supporting 700,000 young people not in education, employment or training; • Increasing the number of young people qualified to at least Level 3; • Improving attainment in literacy and … Continue reading

The Future of Work – This time is different

There are several reasons why current technological progress differs from the past. Innovation cycles are faster. Firms can engage in rapid product prototyping and marketing. Many organisations are less dependent on a core workforce, as they can draw on the power of the crowd and online (platform) labour. The digital world also allows for fast … Continue reading

The Future of Work – The case of India

The overall job landscape in the country is evolving rapidly. Current job surveys that focus on employment in the traditional sectors no longer provide an accurate representation of job creation. Growth of e-commerce and technology-based sectors is leading to the creation of new job ecosystems, which are becoming a large sources of employment. Informal employment … Continue reading

The Future of Work – How does technological change affect the labour market?

Technological change has major implications for the labour market (Figure 2.1). It affects the volume of work available, the nature of work, and pay rates for different workers, and it can be very disruptive. The impacts of technological change can be complex to disentangle, for several reasons. First, more than one impact can occur at … Continue reading

Reskilling and The Future of Work in US – $24,800 per displaced worker, with $4.7 billion from the private sector to reskill 25% of all workers in disrupted jobs

As the Fourth Industrial Revolution impacts skills, tasks and jobs, there is growing concern that both job displacement and talent shortages will impact business dynamism and societal cohesion. A proactive and strategic effort is needed on the part of all relevant stakeholders to manage reskilling and upskilling to mitigate against both job losses and talent … Continue reading

Future of Work – The ILO’s Centenary Global Tour

ILO Director-General Guy Ryder shared his vision of the future of work, at an event at the Graduate Institute, Geneva – part of the ILO’s 24-hour Centenary Global Tour.

The Future of Work in Canada – Trends with the potential to impact

What does the future hold for employment in Canada? Using strategic foresight research methods, this report explores a broad range of trends with the potential to impact Canada’s labour market. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE 1. AI EVERYTHING: AI may impact and potentially disrupt every industry. 2. VR + AR EXPERIENCES: Virtual and Augmented Reality may transform the … Continue reading

The Future of Work – How automation could affect employment for women and minorities

Much has already been said about how automation and artificial intelligence will affect employment and wages. But what about the impact of these trends on women in the workplace? While many obstacles still stand in the way of gender parity, with the right policy actions by governments and businesses, women appear well placed to benefit … Continue reading

Future of Work, Intelligent Automation (IA) and Talents – 10 percent of companies held more than 30 percent of the job postings among the largest 100 US companies

Easing the pressure points: The state of intelligent automation, a new report by KPMG International and HFS Research, provides the data and research needed to help properly assess an organization’s progress on the intelligent automation (IA) journey. Based on a survey of nearly 600 business leaders across 13 countries, this report paints a clear picture … Continue reading

Future of Work, Workforce Development and Community Colleges – They must continue to remain responsive to the unfolding needs of their communities

Postsecondary workforce development is one of the major innovations of the modern community college. In a workforce approach, curriculum is driven by the needs of local industry, course delivery systems are sufficiently flexible to meet the diverse needs of students and industry, and students experience a mixture of work-based and classroom learning. These features combine … Continue reading

Future of Work and VET in Australia – Needs to be a significant upgrade toward a modern, applied and fast-paced alternative to classroom-based learning

On 28 November 2018, the Prime Minister announced an independent review of Australia’s vocational education and training (VET) sector to examine ways to deliver skilled workers for a stronger economy. The review was led by the Honourable Steven Joyce, a former New Zealand Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment. Mr Joyce delivered the final … Continue reading

Future of Work in Australia – A literature review

The impact of globalisation is expected to increase as digital technologies increasingly enable the movement of labour virtually (Baldwin, 2018). We are seeing teleworking becoming mainstream, the rise of the ‘digital nomad’ where a person can work from anywhere in the world, and contingent employment models (Roos and Shroff, 2017). These changes will influence where … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Artificial Intelligence (AI) impacts on learning, teaching, and education

At the November 2017 Gothenburg Summit, the Commission presented the Communication ‘Strengthening European Identity through Education and Culture’, that set out a vision for a European Education Area and announced a dedicated Digital Education Action Plan, which aims to foster digital skills and competences for all citizens. The Action Plan focuses on implementation and the … Continue reading

Future of work and STEM – A summary of technology disruptors and skills needed

Chosen excerpts by Job Market Monitor. Read the whole story at  Shaping the future of STEM skills

Future of Work and Skills System for Scotland and Northern Ireland – A focus on young people alone will not be enough

This report marks the third in a series of three reports looking at what a 21st century skills system should look like, in a comparative study across Northern Ireland and Scotland. PRIORITIES FOR THE SKILLS SYSTEMS IN NORTHERN IRELAND AND SCOTLAND Disruption will be significant over the coming years – the skills system needs to … Continue reading

Future of Work – The costs of reskilling and upskilling for occupational transitions

This work contributes to the “Jobs and Skills” module of the Going Digital horizontal project and to the Skills Outlook 2019 on Skills and Digitalisation. It results from the cooperation between the Directorate for Education and Skills (EDU) and the Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation (STI). It proposes an experimental methodology and first time … Continue reading

The Future of Work and Creative Skills In Australia – Grew at around double the rate of other occupations between 2011 and 2016

New technologies are having, and will continue to have, a pervasive effect on the future of work. As a consequence, employment in digital-intensive industries has more than doubled over the past 30 years. However, the effects are broader than just these industries. The majority of employment growth over that period has been in occupations that … Continue reading

The Future of Work and Automation in England – 1.5 million people employed in jobs at high risk

The calculation of probabilities of automation for individuals on the Annual Population Survey (APS) allows us to produce detailed demographic breakdowns, by taking the average probability of automation within each demographic group. To produce probabilities of automation at four digit occupation level on the APS, we created a pooled dataset of seven years of APS … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Only 29% of HR leaders strongly agree that their business executives prioritize human capital risks

In this year’s study, 73% of executives predict significant industry disruption in the next three years — up from 26% in 2018. This sharp shift in perception about the future business environment applies across geographies and industries, although it is most pronounced in the Life Sciences, Consumer Goods, and Energy sectors (Figure 1). More than … Continue reading

The Future of Work According to the European Youth Forum – 5 solutions

The world of work is changing, shaped by four global megatrends: globalisation, climate change, demographic changes, and technological advancements. Each megatrend brings its own unique challenges for young people and the future of work, as well as some opportunities. With the potential of these megatrends to shape the type of work that is required, the type … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Investing in human capital must be a priority says the World Development Report 2019

The World Development Report (WDR) 2019: The Changing Nature of Work studies how the nature of work is changing as a result of advances in technology today. Fears that robots will take away jobs from people have dominated the discussion over the future of work, but the World Development Report 2019 finds that on balance … Continue reading

Future of Work – 6 Key messages

Act now. This isn’t about some ‘far future’ of work – change is already happening, and accelerating. No regrets and bets. The future isn’t a fixed destination. Plan for a dynamic rather than a static future. You’ll need to recognise multiple and evolving scenarios. Make ‘no regrets’ moves that work with most scenarios – but … Continue reading

The Future of Work in US – Five policy strategies for adjusting to automation

Intended to clear up misconceptions on the subject of automation, the following report employs government and private data, including from the McKinsey Global Institute, to develop both backward- and forward-looking analyses of the impacts of automation over the years 1980 to 2016 and 2016 to 2030 across some 800 occupations. In doing so, the report … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Fostering the benefits of new technologies requires good measures of their impact

The new technologies hold promises but also significant challenges. Advances in digitalization, artificial intelligence, and automation promise to raise productivity and growth, but they are also bound to reshape the economy and the way we work, with the potential to increase inequality. Given the dimension of the possible changes, it will take a comprehensive and … Continue reading

The Future of Work – A human-centred agenda needed ILO says

The ILO Global Commission on the Future of Work  has called on governments to commit to a set of measures in order to address the challenges caused by unprecedented transformational change in the world of work. Co-chaired by South African President Cyril Ramaphosa and Swedish Prime Minister, Stefan Löfven, the commission outlines a vision for a … Continue reading

The Future of Work – President Obama’s top economic adviser on policies

Jason Furman, president Obama’s top economic adviser explains which policies could help workers succeed in an era of globalization and automation. McKinsey: What can be done to alleviate the downsides of globalization? Jason Furman: The most important thing we can do is to equip people to succeed in a world with globalization, a world with artificial intelligence … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Five policies to help the middle class from displacement

A range of sensible policies at the federal and state levels can help limit worker risks of displacement and support adjustments when such displacements occur. Education for 21st century skills For instance, students at all levels of education will need better preparation in what are often called “21st century skills.” These include communication and a … Continue reading

Germany – How the future of work is tackled

Digital technologies could have a disruptive effect on future jobs, as well as on the tasks performed by workers and the skills required of them. There may be an even stronger demand for highly skilled workers, but the outlook for those in medium-skilled manufacturing who hold vocational training degrees is more unsure. This is seen … Continue reading

The Future of Work – New education models for extending the principle of dual education

How should educational systems and school-to-work transition (SWT) regimes be modeled to better serve the needs of Industry 4.0? Although a high level of general education will be important for its training content to develop adaptability, it is not the only component to develop. What will be increasingly important are the work-related skills. This will … Continue reading

The future of Work and Digital Skills – Learning from Grow with Google

Digitisation is transforming the nature of work, as well as many aspects of social and civic life. Digital skills are vital for individuals and national economies to prosper in a rapidly-changing world, bene ting from the opportunities of digital and remaining resilient to potential risks. More than 90 per cent of jobs in some categories … Continue reading

The Future of Work – The skill sets required in both old and new occupations will change

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is interacting with other socio-economic and demographic factors to create a perfect storm of business model change in all industries, resulting in major disruptions to labour markets. New categories of jobs will emerge, partly or wholly displacing others. The skill sets required in both old and new occupations will change in … Continue reading

The Future of Work – We will need to institute retraining of workers on a scale we have not seen for generations

We find a long historical record of innovation that shows technological change has been overwhelmingly positive for productivity and surprisingly benign when it comes to employment. Job displacement has occurred in waves, first with the structural shift from agriculture to manufacturing, and then with the move from manufacturing to services. Throughout, productivity gains generated by … Continue reading

Future of Work – The impact of the new technologies on labour markets and income distribution is not predetermined UN says

There are many concerns that technological innovation will lead to increased unemployment, suppressed wages and greater inequality. However, the impact of the new technologies on labour markets and income distribution is not predetermined. The right policy mix and institutional arrangements can ensure that the benefits of innovation are shared broadly, an essential step to achieving … Continue reading

Future of Work and the Skills Gap – A net positive outlook for jobs, while no less than 54% of all employees will require significant re- and upskilling by 2022,

As technological breakthroughs rapidly shift the frontier between the work tasks performed by humans and those performed by machines and algorithms, global labour markets are undergoing major transformations. These transformations, if managed wisely, could lead to a new age of good work, good jobs and improved quality of life for all, but if managed poorly, … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Organizations need to develop skills in employees that make them more marketable and employable inside and outside the organization

Structural changes in the labor market, including an aging population and the rise of the gig economy, have created a persistent skills gap for employers. This mismatch in talent has become a top challenge for businesses, educators, and policy makers. Businesses understand that a predictable supply of workers is critical to their growth and viability. … Continue reading

Future of Work and Worker Personality – Jobs that currently require more openness to experience or more emotional stability will be less susceptible to automatization

We present evidence suggesting that the so-called “fourth industrial revolution”, characterized by machine learning, big data, mobile robotics and cloud computing, may be skill-biased not only with respect to skills acquired through education, as available theoretical models and empirical evidence abundantly suggest, but also with respect to facets of noncognitive skills. Measuring the future direction … Continue reading

Future of Work in Europe – Innovation will create jobs in the future, but they will be in occupations other than those destroyed by technology

This STOA study investigates the potential employment effects of new information and communication technologies, by examining the relationship between innovation, new technologies, employment and inequality. It reviews the existing literature and experiences of previous technological revolutions, and argues that the race between job creation through new products, and job destruction from process innovation, has been … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Very challenging potential shifts in occupations

Building on our January 2017 report on automation, McKinsey Global Institute’s latest report, Jobs lost, jobs gained: Workforce transitions in a time of automation (PDF–5MB), assesses the number and types of jobs that might be created under different scenarios through 2030 and compares that to the jobs that could be lost to automation. The results … Continue reading

The Future of Work – New technologies are first and foremost tools made by people for people

Professor Klaus Schwab, author of The Fourth Industrial Revolution, calls for leaders and citizens to “together shape a future that works for all by putting people first, empowering them and constantly reminding ourselves that all of these new technologies are first and foremost tools made by people for people.” Humans must be proactive in shaping this technology … Continue reading

The Future of Work in US – Where the robots are

In a new paper out of the Metropolitan policy program, experts John Austin and Richard Kazis discuss rebuilding the rust belt workforce. They point out that many manufacturing hubs across the midwest have not recovered from the disruption of domestic manufacturing jobs. This shift has taken a hit on “employee-based safety net protections,” leaving workers … Continue reading

Future of Work – India at a crossroads

India is at a crossroads. It has the largest young workforce anywhere in the world, and is the fastest growing economy today. At the same time, the economy is not creating enough jobs, and therefore not fully harnessing its “demographic dividend” in preparation for the “Fourth Industrial Revolution”. To create more and better jobs, certain … Continue reading

The Future of Work – HOW PREPARED ARE WE?

The debate on the extent of job destruction due to automation can be imperfect science, involving a high degree of uncertainty and speculation. Most available evidence, however, highlights a need for policies that can shield specific population groups who are most vulnerable to technological unemployment or skills obsolescence. The ESJ survey data identify that lower-educated … Continue reading

The Future of Work, and Wages in Developing Countries – A bloating of service-sector employment and wage stagnation but not to mass unemployment

Automation is likely to affect developing countries in different ways to the way automation affects high-income countries. The poorer a country is, the more jobs it has that are in principle automatable because the kinds of jobs common in developing countries—such as routine agricultural work—are substantially more susceptible to automation than the service jobs—which require … Continue reading

The Future of Work in US – How to fix the broken historical link between labor productivity and wages

In Don’t Fear the Robots: Why Automation Doesn’t Mean the End of Work, Roosevelt Fellow Mark Paul challenges the narrative that large-scale automation will imminently lead to mass unemployment and economic insecurity. He debunks the idea that we are on the cusp of a major technological change that will drastically alter the nature of work, … Continue reading

Skills and the Future of Work in US – Seven initiatives to transform workforce development

A wholesale reexamination of existing strategies and program administration is needed to enable individuals to pursue new opportunities and fuel the country’s economic growth. Federal and state governments are well positioned to serve as a catalyst for this effort by convening the right parties, aligning goals and incentives, and helping to scale promising efforts through … Continue reading

Future of Work – Four cures for automation anxiety

Last year, the Pew Center reported that 72 percent of Americans said they were worried about the impact of automation on jobs – this, despite the unemployment rate at the time being at a twenty-year low (and even lower since). The fears of a jobless dystopia are misplaced. Despite cyclical ups and downs, economies generate … Continue reading

Future of Work in US – 52 percent believe robots will perform most human activities in 30 years

Fifty-two percent of adult internet users believe within 30 years, robots will have advanced to the point where they can perform most of the activities currently done by humans, according to a survey undertaken by researchers at the Brookings Institution. The poll also found people divided 32 to 29 percent regarding whether the U.S. government … Continue reading

Future of Work – Why Countries Need New Job Creation Strategies

China continues to report robust urban job growth that outpaces growth in the country’s labor force—despite a slowdown in economic expansion. By contrast, employment in India grew by only 1.4% per year from 2000 through 2016—despite a compound annual growth rate of 7.2% for the country’s GDP. And in some countries, including Germany and the … Continue reading

The Future of Work – We are moving away from traditional manufacturing, even away from traditional services

An interview with economist Christopher Pissarides What we are seeing now are probably some of the biggest changes in labor markets we have seen for a very long time. Of course, if you put it into historical perspective, they are not quite as big as 200 years ago, when the economy was urbanizing. Those were … Continue reading

The Future of Work, Dystopia or Utopia – Brookings Vice President Darrell West on the issue (video)

Emerging technologies like artificial intelligence and robotics will have a dramatic impact on the future of work. Already, today’s most valuable technology companies employ about one-fifth as many workers as the most valuable companies in the 1960s. Estimates of workforce displacement due to automation range from the OECD’s 14 percent of current jobs to the … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Cognitive as well as non-cognitive skills are strongly rewarded by labour markets OECD says

This study explores how the digital transformation is affecting the demand for skills in 31 countries, by analysing how skills are rewarded in sectors which are more or less digitally intensive. In so far as higher salaries reflect relative skills shortage, returns to skills contribute to inform on how the demand of different skills is … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Job Transition Pathway Optimization Model for reskilling and upskilling

As the types of skills needed in the labour market change rapidly, individual workers will have to engage in life-long learning if they are to achieve fulfilling and rewarding careers. For companies, reskilling and upskilling strategies will be critical if they are to find the talent they need and to contribute to socially responsible approaches … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Retraining and reskilling to ease the strain of automation

The Industrial Revolution created a lot of middle-class jobs—with a big lag, a lot of pain and suffering, and a lot of urbanization to go along with it. The transition to the service economy left behind many people, who still feel stranded, because they thought of themselves as contributing productively in the manufacturing sector. But … Continue reading

The Future of Work in Australia – The critical imperative is to ensure that workers – particularly low- skilled men – can access retraining and education opportunities

This sixth report in BCEC’s Focus on the States series looks at the changing nature of employment, the quality of work, and considers the role of technology in the jobs of the future. The report also sheds light on patterns of employment and hours worked across industry sectors, and brings empirical evidence to bear on … Continue reading

The Future of Work in US – How to rebuild the links among work, opportunity, and economic security for all Americans in the face of accelerating change

The challenge facing the United States today is to rebuild the links among work, opportunity, and economic security for all Americans in the face of accelerating technological change. The world is in the midst of a transformation in the nature of work, as smart machines, artificial intelligence, new technologies, and global competition remake how people … Continue reading

Future of Work – Between 75 million and 375 million people around the world may need to change occupation and acquire new skills by 2030

Our starting point is the new MGI report on the future of work, which is called Jobs lost, jobs gained: Workforce transitions in a time of automation. One of the major findings of the report is that between 75 million and 375 million people around the world may need to change occupational categories and acquire … Continue reading

Future of Work in Canada – A skills lab cannot be a solely federal initiative

In the aftermath of the economic crisis, few policy issues have attracted as much attention as skills development. Discussion has focused on the types of skills that employees need to ensure they can successfully navigate an ever-more demanding labour market, and those that employers need to have on hand to help them survive in an … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Wages, income inequality, skills and transition

For large shares of the population in the advanced economies, there has really been no positive movement or no sense of progress in terms of where their incomes have gone over the last one to two decades. When we looked at the data across the US as well as a set of European economies, we … Continue reading

Future of Work – Automation has not been employment-displacing but has reduced labor’s share in value added study finds

Is automation a labor-displacing force? This possibility is both an age-old concern and at the heart of a new theoretical literature considering how labor immiseration may result from a wave of “brilliant machines,” which is in part motivated by declining labor shares in many developed countries. Comprehensive evidence on this labor-displacing channel is at present … Continue reading

The Future of Work in Canada – Eight archetypes of jobs

According to three recent studies, based on 2011 Census data from Statistics Canada (see Figure 1), predictions about the number of jobs threatened by automation range from 35 to 42 percent. The varying percentages result from di erent approaches to calculating the coming speed and pervasiveness of automation. Methodology aside, even at the low end … Continue reading

Future of Work – Automation is a threat to low-income Workers unless the education and workforce systems change

In order to help low-income workers weather the economic storm of automation, a number of changes to the education and workforce retraining systems are needed: 1.     Better data must be provided so that practitioners and policymakers can predict and measure the impact of automation and adjust their training programs accordingly. These resources need to be … Continue reading

The Future of Work in Australia – Many jobs will get better, but we will need different skills to do them report says

Over the past 70 years, the nature of work in Australia has transformed. The rst major shi was a gradual transition in the industries Australians worked in. Jobs in construction, manufacturing, mining and agricultural decreased while service sector jobs increased and now employ 80 per cent of Australians. A second shift has been an increase … Continue reading

The Future of Work – In one chart

You’ve seen the headlines: “Robots Will Destroy Our Jobs—and We’re Not Ready for It.” “You Will Lose Your Job to a Robot—and Sooner Than You Think.” “Robots May Steal as Many as 800 Million Jobs in the Next 13 Years.” Such stories are tempting to take at face value. Who wouldn’t want to know if their … Continue reading

Future of Work in Canada – Which provinces are ready?

Some provinces, with more economic diversification or a concentration of workers in areas that are not very susceptible to automation, appear to be better situated for technological change than others, according to a new report from the C.D. Howe Institute. In “Risk and Readiness: The Impact of Automation on Provincial Labour Markets,” author Rosalie Wyonch … Continue reading

Future of Work in US – Roughly three-quarters of Americans think it’s realistic that robots and computers might one day do many jobs

Many Americans expect certain professions to be dominated by automation in their lifetime – but few see their own jobs at risk. Roughly three-quarters of Americans think it’s realistic that robots and computers might one day do many jobs currently done by humans, and sizable majorities expect jobs such as fast food workers and insurance … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Between almost zero and one- third of work activities could be displaced by 2030

In our latest research on automation, we examine work that can be automated through 2030 and jobs that may be created in the same period. We draw from lessons from history and develop various scenarios for the future. While it is hard to predict how all this will play out, our research provides some insights … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Jobs matter and labour markets do not stand still

Jobs matter. For almost all of us, they are more than a source of income, extending to the provision of opportunities for social interaction; a source of self-esteem; or a feeling of contribution to a profession or community. From an economy-wide viewpoint, growing employment rates and higher labour market participation are primary sources of improved … Continue reading

The Future of Work in the Automotive Sector – Deteriorating employment and working conditions.

This summary report on the future of work in the automotive sector focuses on the major changes facing the sector. These include: the rise of emerging economies, new mobilities, the “greening” of the product, and the digitalization of production. This is in order to identify the main challenges for employment and industrial relations and to … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Four ways work will change

Speakers at “The Future of Work,” an all-day symposium held at Stanford’s Frances C. Arrillaga Alumni Center on August 30, explored the changing workplace, new possibilities for higher education, and technology’s impact on careers and industries. The event, attended by about 300 people, was presented by Stanford Career Education and OZY EDU, the education arm of … Continue reading

The Future of Work in Europe – A union perspective

“Yes we can, but no we’re not” Just before the final plenary session, the conference’s ‘themeweaver’ Jacki Davis summarised three days of intense discussion on ‘shaping the new world of work’. “The stakes could not be higher,” she stated, in an economy witnessing increased robotisation and digitalisation. The reshaping of the world of work brings … Continue reading

The Future of Work – A false alarmism that contributes to a culture of risk aversion and holds back technology adoption

In this study we use a novel and comprehensive method to map out how employment is likely to change, and the implications for skills. We show both what we can expect, and where we should be uncertain. We also show likely dynamics in different parts of the labour market — from sectors like food and … Continue reading

Future of Work – Future Skills by the Australian Industry Skills Committee

The Australian Industry Skills Committee (AISC) commissioned the Future Skills and Training Resource to gather and analyse data on Australian and international megatrends, their potential impact on Australia’s future workforce and the implications for vocational education and training.  It complements existing data sources and Industry Reference Committee (IRC) intelligence. It is a practical resource intended to … Continue reading

The future of work is there for us to make ILO says

Future of Work in US – 58% say there should be limits on the number of jobs that businesses can replace with machines

Americans are apprehensive about a future in which machines take on more of the work now done by humans, and most are supportive of policies aimed at cushioning the economic impact of widespread automation, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. The vast majority of Americans (85%) say they would support restricting workforce automation … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Erica Groshen, former head of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics on

There is growing attention being paid to the future of work, and concern that changing work relationships—for example, independent contractors, contract agency workers, gig workers, app-based workers, etc.—are evolving faster than BLS can develop the tools to measure. How has BLS considered collecting data to document these forms of work? The main thing BLS has … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Artificial Intelligence (AI) won’t replace most jobs but people using it are starting to replace people who don’t

As AI is increasingly applied to knowledge work, a significant shift will likely take place in the workplace, affecting many jobs in the Western middle class. Contrary to recent dire predictions about AI’s effect on employment, our survey suggests cautious optimism. Most respondents, for example, do not expect that AI will lead to a reduction … Continue reading

The Future of Work – 95% believe they need new skills to stay relevant at work

Digital has already delivered a major blow to businesses slow to respond. There’s more to come. The very concept of work is being redefined as different generations enter and exit the workforce amidst a rapidly changing technological landscape. Responsive and responsible leaders at the very highest levels of the organization must act to harness the … Continue reading

The Future of Work – The Middle East and North Africa

Education and work in the Middle East and North Africa region will determine the livelihoods of over 300 million people and drive growth and development for generations to come. As one of the youngest populations in the world, it is imperative that the region make adequate investments in education and learning that hold value in … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Launch of the ILO’s Global Commission

The Prime Minister of Sweden Stefan Löfven and the President of Mauritius, Ameenah Gurib-Fakim, along with the ILO Director-General Guy Ryder launched a Global Commission on the Future of Work today at the International Labour Organization’s headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. Chosen excerpts by Job Market Monitor. Read the whole story at B-roll: Launch of the ILO’s Global … Continue reading

The Future of Work – Where the robots are in US : A map

The Metro program has followed the lead of economists Daron Acemoglu and Pascual Restrepo who, in a recent paper, deployed sales data from International Federation for Robotics (IFR) to explore trends in the installation of robots in U.S. and international work places. Although Acemoglu and Restrepo’s paper has been controversial in its modeling of large … Continue reading

The future of Work – Adaptability is the key

One clear lesson arises from our analysis: adaptability – in organisations, individuals and society – is essential for navigating the changes ahead. It’s impossible to predict exactly the skills that will be needed even ve years from now, so workers and organisations need to be ready to adapt – in each of the worlds we … Continue reading

The Future of Work – A framework for understanding 

What are the components that collectively constitute “the future of work”? Perhaps the logical place to begin is with the forces that are driving these changes (figure 1). Based on our experience and research, we have identified three forces that are shaping the nature of future work and the future workforce: Technology. Technological advances—for example, … Continue reading

The Future of Work and Automation – The policy implications

The adoption of new technology and new work practices poses particular challenges to both business and policy makers. What are the key priorities they should look to address? Chosen excerpts by Job Market Monitor. Read the whole story at The digital future of work: Policy implications of automation | McKinsey & Company Related Posts The Future of … Continue reading

The Future of Work – What automation will change

Technology experts and economists are engaged in a growing debate about the effect of automation technologies in the workplace. Some “techno-pessimists” are concerned about the mass destruction of jobs, while “techno-optimists” see considerable productivity gains for the economy that will in turn help create new work opportunities. Technology in the past has tended to create … Continue reading

The Future of Work – The skills that will count

For young people today, what’s clear is that they’re going to need to continue to learn throughout their lifetime. The idea that you get an education when you’re young and then you stop and you go and work for 40 or 50 years with that educational training and that’s it—that’s over. All of us are … Continue reading

Cashiers, The Future of Work and Amazon’s purchase of Whole Foods

Amazon’s $13.4 billion purchase of Whole Foods, announced Friday, could speed that vision along. Amazon has already made shopping for almost everything involve spending less time waiting, doing work or interacting with people, and now it could do the same for groceries. It’s already trying with a store in Seattle, Amazon Go, that has no … Continue reading

Future of work – ILO’s Symposium highlights

Highlights from the Symposium featuring voices from the world of work, leading thinkers in government and academia, and the youth on the challenges we’ll face in the Future of Work. Related Posts Education, Training and The Future of Work – Five majors issues POSTED BY MICHEL COURNOYER ⋅ MAY 4, 2017 ⋅ LEAVE A COMMENT Some … Continue reading

Education, Training and The Future of Work – Five majors issues

Some 1,408 responded to the following question, sharing their expectations about what is likely to evolve by 2026: In the next 10 years, do you think we will see the emergence of new educational and training programs that can successfully train large numbers of workers in the skills they will need to perform the jobs … Continue reading

The Future of Work – What do we want ? (video)

Highlights from award-winning economic historian Robert Skidelsky giving a keynote address about the future of work with remarks by ILO Director-General Guy Ryder.

The future of work – The major trends

Gender gap in participation rates is not expected to improve over the coming 15 years Few countries combine an environmentally sustainable footprint with decent work Declining labour force participations rates will exacerbate demographic changes Migration is likely to intensify in the future as decent work deficits remain widespread Global supply chain related jobs go well … Continue reading

Future of Work – We are not facing an employment crisis but a work revolution the World Employment Confederation (International Confederation of Private Employment Services) says

The World Employment Confederation (formerly Ciett) looks into the future of work and urges policymakers to cooperate with the employment industry to determine enhanced international labour regulation As the world of work becomes increasingly flat and interconnected, new global labour policies and regulation are required to deal with issues that go beyond national or regional … Continue reading

Technology, jobs, and the future of work – Several solution spaces to consider

Automation, digital platforms, and other innovations are changing the fundamental nature of work. Understanding these shifts can help policy makers, business leaders, and workers move forward.  Policy makers will need to address issues such as benfits and variability that these digital platforms can raise. ƒAccelerate the creation of jobs in general through stimulating investment and … Continue reading

Robots and the future of work – Interview with Professor Richard Freeman (video)

Freelance economy and the future of work 

Are these types of platforms an economic boon to workers who want a flexible way togenerate income? Or are they the latest sign of worsening income inequality and a fraying safety net for workers? The answer is a little bit of both. Recent research from the McKinsey Global Institute examined the economic potential associated with … Continue reading

Automation, jobs, and the future of work – There’s always painful dislocation

The topic of job displacement has, throughout US history, ignited frustration over technological advances and their tendency to make traditional jobs obsolete; artisans protested textile mills in the early 19th century, for example… A conversation Reid Hoffman: If you look at most of the automation, it comes down to man–machine combinations. And all productivity means … Continue reading

Discussion

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Jobs – Offres d’emploi – US & Canada (Eng. & Fr.)

The Most Popular Job Search Tools

Even More Objectives Statements to customize

Cover Letters – Tools, Tips and Free Cover Letter Templates for Microsoft Office

Follow Job Market Monitor on WordPress.com

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Follow Job Market Monitor via Twitter

Categories

Archives

%d bloggers like this: