A Closer Look

Education, Training and The Future of Work – Five majors issues

Some 1,408 responded to the following question, sharing their expectations about what is likely to evolve by 2026:

In the next 10 years, do you think we will see the emergence of new educational and training programs that can successfully train large numbers of workers in the skills they will need to perform the jobs of the future?

The nonscientific canvassing found that 70% of these particular respondents said “yes” – such programs would emerge and be successful. A majority among the 30% who said “no” generally do not believe adaptation in teaching environments will be sufficient to teach new skills at the scale that is necessary to help workers keep abreast of the tech changes that will upend millions of jobs. (See “About this canvassing of experts” for further details about the limits of this sample.)

Participants were asked to explain their answers and offered the following prompts to consider:

  • What are the most important skills needed to succeed in the workforce of the future?
  • Which of these skills can be taught effectively via online systems – especially those that are self-directed – and other nontraditional settings?
  • Which skills will be most difficult to teach at scale?
  • Will employers be accepting of applicants who rely on new types of credentialing systems, or will they be viewed as less qualified than those who have attended traditional four-year and graduate programs?

Several common expectations were evident in these respondents’ answers, no matter how hopeful or fretful they were about the future of skills- and capabilities-training efforts. (It is important to note that many respondents listed human behaviors, attributes and competencies in describing desirable work skills. Although these aspects of psychology cannot be classified as “skills” and perhaps cannot be directly taught in any sort of training environment, we include these answers under the general heading of skills, capabilities and attributes.)

Most participants in this canvassing wrote detailed elaborations explaining their positions, though they were allowed to respond anonymously. Their well-considered comments provide insights about hopeful and concerning trends. These findings do not represent all possible points of view, but they do reveal a wide range of striking observations. Respondents collectively articulated five major themes…

Chosen excerpts by Job Market Monitor. Read the whole story at Experts on the Future of Work, Jobs Training and Skills | Pew Research Center

Related Posts

Automation around the World – 1.2 billion full-time equivalents and $14.6 trillion in wages

Today, about half the activities that people are paid to do in the global economy have the potential to be automated by adapting demonstrated technology. As we’ve described previously, our focus is on individual work activities, which we believe to be a more useful way to examine automation potential than looking at entire jobs, since most … Continue reading

Automation in Australia – More than five million jobs, almost 40 per cent, have a moderate to high likelihood of disappearing in the next 10 to 15 years

More than five million jobs, almost 40 per cent of Australian jobs that exist today, have a moderate to high likelihood of disappearing in the next 10 to 15 years due to technological advancements, a CEDA report being released today has found. Figure 1 shows the estimated probabilities of the susceptibility of jobs to computerisation … Continue reading

Automation in Trucking – Many jobs are not likely to disappear anytime soon

Automation has become one of the major ongoing stories regarding the future of the American economy. What began with the rise of robots—and loss of jobs—across manufacturing industries is now a full blown threat to traditional jobs across all industries, salary bands, and education requirements. The effects are wide-reaching, no job may be safe.  On … Continue reading

Automation – The potential scope is expanding

In tandem with the diffusion of computer technologies, labour markets across the OECD have undergone rapid structural transformation. In this paper, we examine i) the impact of technological change on labour market outcomes since the computer revolution of the 1980s, and ii) recent developments in digital technology – including machine learning and robotics – and … Continue reading

Automation and skills – More education, and different kinds

A broad area of agreement: People need to learn new skills to work in the new economy. “The best response is to increase the skills of the labor force,” said Gregory Mankiw, an economist at Harvard.  The most valuable thing could be to increase college enrollment and graduation rates. A growing number of jobs require … Continue reading

Technology and Jobs – Automation and digitalisation are unlikely to destroy large numbers of jobs

In recent years, there has been a revival of concerns that automation and digitalisation might after all result in a jobless future. The debate has been fuelled by studies for the US and Europe arguing that a substantial share of jobs is at “risk of computerisation”. These studies follow an occupation-based approach proposed by Frey … Continue reading

Australia – More than five million jobs gone to computerisation and automation in 10 to 15 years

More than five million jobs, almost 40 per cent of Australian jobs that exist today, have a moderate to high likelihood of disappearing in the next 10 to 15 years due to technological advancements, a CEDA report being released today has found. Australia and the world is on the cusp of a new but very … Continue reading

Automation, jobs, and the future of work – There’s always painful dislocation

The topic of job displacement has, throughout US history, ignited frustration over technological advances and their tendency to make traditional jobs obsolete; artisans protested textile mills in the early 19th century, for example… A conversation Reid Hoffman: If you look at most of the automation, it comes down to man–machine combinations. And all productivity means … Continue reading

UK – 35% of UK jobs are at high risk from automation over the next two decades finds Deloitte UK

Our London Futures insights series focuses on the London economy and what it needs to do to maintain and reinforce its position as a leading global business hub. Our latest report in the programme, Agiletown: the relentless march of technology and London’s response, focuses on the challenges and opportunities that technology presents to London. The … Continue reading

Digital Talents Gap – Developing them among the existing workforce

Companies are trying a variety of unconventional methods to bring in digital talent. Facebook, for example, has “acquihired” the employees of more than a dozen companies—buying these companies as much or more for the employees as for the business itself. Meanwhile, Citigroup and others are introducing online gaming apps, either as recruiting tools or to … Continue reading

The impact on employment and wages of Robots in US – No overall positive impact on any group

As robots and other computer-assisted technologies take over tasks previously performed by labour, there is increasing concern about the future of jobs and wages. This column discusses evidence that industrial robots reduced employment and wages between 1990 and 2007. Estimates suggest that an extra robot per 1,000 workers reduces the employment to population ratio by 0.18-0.34 … Continue reading

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Jobs – Offres d’emploi – US & Canada (Eng. & Fr.)

The Most Popular Job Search Tools

Even More Objectives Statements to customize

Cover Letters – Tools, Tips and Free Cover Letter Templates for Microsoft Office

Follow Job Market Monitor on WordPress.com

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Follow Job Market Monitor via Twitter

Categories

Archives

%d bloggers like this: