US

This tag is associated with 1564 posts

Canadian vs American Jobs – The skill level is significantly higher in 30 of the 35 areas examined

Increased globalization places competitive pressures on firms heavily involved in international trade. To be successful, firms must be innovative and productive—two attributes that rely greatly on a skilled workforce. Key in the toolbox of productive workers are science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) skills. However, STEM skills are often not enough to generate significant productivity … Continue reading

Immigration in US – Support for increasing the level of legal immigration has risen

While there has been considerable attention on illegal immigration into the U.S. recently, opinions about legal immigration have undergone a long-term change. Support for increasing the level of legal immigration has risen, while the share saying legal immigration should decrease has fallen. The survey by Pew Research Center, conducted June 5-12 among 2,002 adults, finds … Continue reading

Skills and the Future of Work in US – Seven initiatives to transform workforce development

A wholesale reexamination of existing strategies and program administration is needed to enable individuals to pursue new opportunities and fuel the country’s economic growth. Federal and state governments are well positioned to serve as a catalyst for this effort by convening the right parties, aligning goals and incentives, and helping to scale promising efforts through … Continue reading

US – The disappearing male worker

With unemployment at 3.8 percent, its lowest level in many years, the labor market seems healthy. But that number hides a perplexing anomaly: The percentage of men who are neither working nor looking for work has risen substantially over the past several decades. The issue, in economist’s jargon, is labor force participation. When the Bureau … Continue reading

Gender Occupational Segregation in US – Continues to hover near 50 percent

A deeper examination of women and men’s labor market outcomes reveals another important way that gender disparities still manifest: the separation of men and women into different occupations. Women still tend to work in very different jobs than men, and occupational segregation has changed little over the last two decades, as shown in the figure … Continue reading

Disability in US – Nine percent of adults aged 25 to 54, or 11 million, reported at least one of six disabilities in 2016

A smaller share of people in their prime working years (25-54) are employed now than in decades past, and some have wondered whether disabilities and health problems have played a role in that decline. People with disabilities have much lower employment rates than people without disabilities, and disabilities are one of the most commonly cited … Continue reading

Unstable and On-Call Work Schedules in US and Canada – One out of six works a schedule that varies primarily according to employer needs

Unstable work schedules are schedules in which the times of work vary and workers have little or no control over that variability, either as individuals or through collective agreements. These schedules are also often called “just-in-time” schedules. Their main attraction for employers is flexibility: the ability to respond to changes in demand and other contingencies, … Continue reading

Foreign Grads Working in US – Nearly 1.5 million between 2004 and 2016

Between 2004 and 2016, nearly 1.5 million foreign graduates of U.S. colleges and universities obtained authorization to remain and work in the U.S. through the federal government’s Optional Practical Training program (OPT). More than half (53%) of the foreign graduates approved for employment specialized in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, according to a … Continue reading

US Mothers – Spending more time in the labor force than in the past, but also more time on child care

In 2016, moms spent about 25 hours a week on paid work, compared with nine hours in 1965. At the same time, they spent 14 hours a week on child care, up from 10 hours a week in 1965. (Dads, too, are spending more time in child care than they were a half-century ago.) Seven-in-ten … Continue reading

Unemployment Below 4 Percent in US – What does it mean ?

Job creation is increasingly limited not by employers’ optimism or confidence or so-called animal spirits, but on the hard limit caused by the finite number of humans to fill those jobs. And so the focus of policy seems as if it should be less on creating more jobs and more on trying to make the … Continue reading

Job Report in US – With alternative seasonal and weather-adjustment, employment actually decelerated, very slightly in April

April jobs growth was modestly boosted by the weather effect. This is because the level of employment in the previous month was held down by unusually snowy weather in early March, whereas April was roughly in line with seasonal norms. The official BLS data show that employment growth picked up a little in April, from … Continue reading

Job Report in US, April 2018 – Employment increased by 164,000 and unemployment at 3.9 percent

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 164,000 in April, and the unemployment rate edged down to 3.9 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Job gains occurred in professional and business services, manufacturing, health care, and mining. Household Survey Data In April, the unemployment rate edged down to 3.9 percent, following 6 months … Continue reading

Worker-Training and Adjustment Policies in US – A reform program

There has been growing speculation that a coming wave of innovation—indeed, a tsunami—powered by artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics, will disrupt labor markets, generate mass unemployment, and shift the few jobs that remain into the insecure “gig economy.” Kneejerk “solutions” from such technology Cassandras include ideas like taxing “robots” and implementing universal basic income for … Continue reading

Working Poor in US, 2015 – About 43.1 million people, or 13.5 percent of the population

In 2015, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 43.1 million people, or 13.5 percent of the nation’s population, lived below the official poverty level.1 (See the technical notes section for examples of poverty levels.) Although the poor were primarily children and adults who had not participated in the labor force during the year, 8.6 … Continue reading

Millennials in US – The largest generation in labor force

More than one-in-three American labor force participants (35%) are Millennials, making them the largest generation in the U.S. labor force, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. As of 2017 – the most recent year for which data are available – 56 million Millennials (those ages 21 to 36 in … Continue reading

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