Report

Immigrants in the EU – Employment rate of second generation immigrants similar to native-born with a native background

What is the educational and labour market performance of second generation immigrants in the European Union (EU)? How do the native-born decendants of immigrants perform in contrast to their counterparts with native-born parents? How do they develop compared with first generation immigrants? Does the origin of their foreign-born parents influence their performance? The answers to these questions and many more can be found in the series of Statistics Explained articles on second generation immigrants that have just been published by Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union. A larger range of data is available in the Eurostat database.

In 2014, 82.4% (or 251.7 million individuals) of the EU population aged 15-64 were native born with native background, 11.5% (36.5 million) were foreign-born and 6.1% (18.4 million) were considered as second generation immigrants, as 4.4% (13.3 million) had at least one parent born in the EU and 1.7% (5.1 million) had both parents born outside the EU.

Among the EU Member States for which data are available the highest proportions of second generation immigrants in the total resident population were registered in Estonia (21.4%), Latvia (19.1%), Luxembourg (16.2%), France (14.3%), Sweden (11.2%), Belgium (11.0%), Slovenia (10.6%) and Croatia (10.3%).

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Employment rate of second generation immigrants in the EU similar to native-born with a native background

In 2014, in the EU as a whole, 81.1% of second generation immigrants aged 25-54 with at least one parent born in the EU were employed. This rate was slightly above that for the native-born with a native background (78.6%, 2.5 pp difference) and 7.1 pp higher than for second generation immigrants having two parents born outside the EU (74.0%). Second generation immigrants with EU background also had higher employment rates than first generation immigrants born in another EU Member State (4.0 pp difference) or in a non-EU country (15.6 pp).

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Chosen excerpts by Job Market Monitor. Read the whole story at  Second generation immigrants in the EU generally well integrated into the labour market

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