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US – 6.4 million workers want full-time jobs but are working only part-time hours

An ongoing structural shift toward more intensive use of part-time employment by many employers is driving the elevated rate of involuntary part-time work. Over six years into an economic recovery, the share of people working part time because they can only get part-time hours remains at recessionary levels. The number working part time involuntarily remains … Continue reading

Technology, jobs, and the future of work – Several solution spaces to consider

Automation, digital platforms, and other innovations are changing the fundamental nature of work. Understanding these shifts can help policy makers, business leaders, and workers move forward.  Policy makers will need to address issues such as benfits and variability that these digital platforms can raise. ƒAccelerate the creation of jobs in general through stimulating investment and … Continue reading

Employment Insurance Coverage in Canada, 2015 – 65.3% of all unemployed paid premiums with 81.1% of them being eligible

The eligibility rate for receiving regular Employment Insurance (EI) benefits was 82.8% in 2015, little changed from 83.1% in 2014. In all, 848,000 unemployed people contributed to the EI program in 2015, as they paid premiums in the 12 months preceding their unemployment spell. This represented 65.3% of all unemployed, the largest share since 2009. From 2014 to 2015, the proportion of unemployed people who contributed to the EI … Continue reading

Work-Based Learning for Youth in US – Promising practices

This paper examines four different youth work-based learning strategies, each targeting different youth populations and industry sectors, and identifies key elements of these programs’ success, challenges each has needed to address, and policy recommendations to address these challenges. Why work-based learning Well-designed work-based learning opportunities provide youth participants with occupational and work readiness training while … Continue reading

16–18-year-olds in UK – Making the apprenticeship system work

Too many 16–18-year-olds are studying level 2 courses that do not help them progress to higher levels of vocational education or start a successful career. This is contributing to England’s relatively high levels of youth unemployment, as many young people struggle to make the transition from education to work. The current system of vocational education … Continue reading

Skills Recognition Systems – Filling the lack of hard, direct evidence of its contribution

Skills recognition systems are an important component of skills development, employment and migration policies. If designed and implemented properly, they bring benefits to individuals, employers and to the economy as a whole. However, this development and implementation give rise to a number of challenges, namely in the areas of stakeholder involvement, awareness raising and impact … Continue reading

Going to University in UK – So what skills ‘premium’, if any, do individuals gain from it ?

With nearly three-in-five graduates in the UK working in non-graduate jobs, the UK has one of the highest levels of self-reported over-qualification amongst its graduates in Europe. So what skills ‘premium’, if any, do individuals gain from going to university? And with the UK not producing enough of the highly skilled jobs for our graduates … Continue reading

VET in Finland – There are no dead-ends within the education system

More than 40% of the relevant age group start upper secondary VET studies immediately after basic education; most of these obtain their VET qualifications at vocational institutions. All qualifications include at least six months’ on-the-job learning. The most popular fields are technology, communications and transport, and social services, health and sports. Half the students are … Continue reading

Germany – Integrating Refugees into the Labor Market

Despite the creation of countless programs and initiatives to help new arrivals integrate into the labor market, refugees and asylum seekers face real hurdles getting jobs at their skill level. Among the barriers: Most newcomers speak little or no German and language courses are vastly oversubscribed and often prioritize groups who stand a good chance … Continue reading

International Students in Canadian Universities – Slightly higher than the OECD average

Relative to other countries, in the 2012-2013 school year Canada ranked slightly higher than the OECD average for international students as a proportion of all students for all three levels of study (see Chart 2). In relation to other primarily English speaking countries, Canada has hosted a lower proportion of international students than Australia, the … Continue reading

International Migrants – 244 million in 2015, up from 222 million in 2010 and 173 million in 2000

• The number of international migrants worldwide has continued to grow rapidly over the past fifteen years reaching 244 million in 2015, up from 222 million in 2010 and 173 million in 2000. • Nearly two thirds of all international migrants live in Europe (76 million) or Asia (75 million). Northern America hosted the third … Continue reading

Apprenticeships for 16-18s in UK – The average annual cost to providers is higher than for adults by around £2502 per apprentice per year

1. The average annual cost to providers of delivering apprenticeships for 16- 18s is higher than for adults by around £2502 per apprentice per year. This is largely driven by ancillary support; sub-contracting of external training providers or assessors; and teaching. Therefore if we assume an average duration of an apprenticeship across both age groups … Continue reading

Canada has no shortage of labour market information, but …

Canada has no shortage of labour market information. However, the data is fragmented, often hard to access and has many gaps, such as developments in the workplace, the balance of labour demand and supply in local markets, and the longer-term experience of college and university graduates in the labour market, to name just a few. … Continue reading

The Apprenticeship Levy in UK – How will employers respond?

From April 2017, large employers in the UK will be required to pay an apprenticeship levy based on their total pay bill. This study, undertaken by the Institute for Employment Research and IFF Research, was commissioned by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (though the policy responsibility for FE and apprenticeships has now shifted … Continue reading

Labour Market Information (LMI) – Working at sectoral level

There are many different ways to assess the scale and nature of changing skills demand. Skills supply also has several facets. Analysis of skills demand and supply and possible mismatches can take many different forms. A sectoral approach to such matters is de ned as one which looks at changing skills needs from the perspective … Continue reading

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