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Cities in UK – They should support economic growth to attract and retain a greater number of graduates, then it needs to

Attracting and retaining talent is increasingly critical for the success of city economies as the UK continues to specialise in ever more high-skilled, knowledge- intensive activities. And this is a big challenge for many of our cities. While the UK’s great universities are spread around the country, many graduates head straight for the bright lights … Continue reading

Partnerships Between Post‐Secondary Education and Business – Six principles for success

Partnerships between post-secondary education (PSE) institutions and businesses are crucial to Canada’s competitiveness and prosperity. They help to develop and leverage skills, talent, and research. PSE institutions, businesses, and community stakeholders need better information on how to develop, operate, and maintain successful PSE–business partnerships. This report shows that partnerships are most effective when they are … Continue reading

Regulated Professions in Ontario – Labour Market Trends and Outlooks

A key differentiating factor is the marked difference in the proportion of graduates from professional programs who become licensed members and practise in their respective profession. A large proportion of graduates from education, health and law programs pursue licensure, although many law and education graduates work in unrelated occupations. The rates of engineering and architecture … Continue reading

US – How many immigrants are underemployed (i.e., in low-skilled jobs) or unemployed?

The United States has long attracted some of the world’s best and brightest, drawn by the strong U.S. economy, renowned universities, and reputation for entrepreneurship and innovation. But because of language, credential-recognition, and other barriers many of these highly skilled, college-educated immigrants cannot fully contribute their academic and professional training and skills once in the … Continue reading

Global Health Requirements – 50 million decent jobs are missing now, 84 million jobs in 15 years says ILO

An estimated 50 million decent jobs are missing in 2016 to address essential global health requirements through universal health coverage (UHC) and ensure human security, particularly with respect to highly infectious diseases like Ebola. Demographic ageing over the next 15 years is expected to further increase employment needs in the global health supply chain by … Continue reading

US – 6.4 million workers want full-time jobs but are working only part-time hours

An ongoing structural shift toward more intensive use of part-time employment by many employers is driving the elevated rate of involuntary part-time work. Over six years into an economic recovery, the share of people working part time because they can only get part-time hours remains at recessionary levels. The number working part time involuntarily remains … Continue reading

Technology, jobs, and the future of work – Several solution spaces to consider

Automation, digital platforms, and other innovations are changing the fundamental nature of work. Understanding these shifts can help policy makers, business leaders, and workers move forward.  Policy makers will need to address issues such as benfits and variability that these digital platforms can raise. ƒAccelerate the creation of jobs in general through stimulating investment and … Continue reading

Employment Insurance Coverage in Canada, 2015 – 65.3% of all unemployed paid premiums with 81.1% of them being eligible

The eligibility rate for receiving regular Employment Insurance (EI) benefits was 82.8% in 2015, little changed from 83.1% in 2014. In all, 848,000 unemployed people contributed to the EI program in 2015, as they paid premiums in the 12 months preceding their unemployment spell. This represented 65.3% of all unemployed, the largest share since 2009. From 2014 to 2015, the proportion of unemployed people who contributed to the EI … Continue reading

Work-Based Learning for Youth in US – Promising practices

This paper examines four different youth work-based learning strategies, each targeting different youth populations and industry sectors, and identifies key elements of these programs’ success, challenges each has needed to address, and policy recommendations to address these challenges. Why work-based learning Well-designed work-based learning opportunities provide youth participants with occupational and work readiness training while … Continue reading

16–18-year-olds in UK – Making the apprenticeship system work

Too many 16–18-year-olds are studying level 2 courses that do not help them progress to higher levels of vocational education or start a successful career. This is contributing to England’s relatively high levels of youth unemployment, as many young people struggle to make the transition from education to work. The current system of vocational education … Continue reading

Skills Recognition Systems – Filling the lack of hard, direct evidence of its contribution

Skills recognition systems are an important component of skills development, employment and migration policies. If designed and implemented properly, they bring benefits to individuals, employers and to the economy as a whole. However, this development and implementation give rise to a number of challenges, namely in the areas of stakeholder involvement, awareness raising and impact … Continue reading

Going to University in UK – So what skills ‘premium’, if any, do individuals gain from it ?

With nearly three-in-five graduates in the UK working in non-graduate jobs, the UK has one of the highest levels of self-reported over-qualification amongst its graduates in Europe. So what skills ‘premium’, if any, do individuals gain from going to university? And with the UK not producing enough of the highly skilled jobs for our graduates … Continue reading

VET in Finland – There are no dead-ends within the education system

More than 40% of the relevant age group start upper secondary VET studies immediately after basic education; most of these obtain their VET qualifications at vocational institutions. All qualifications include at least six months’ on-the-job learning. The most popular fields are technology, communications and transport, and social services, health and sports. Half the students are … Continue reading

Germany – Integrating Refugees into the Labor Market

Despite the creation of countless programs and initiatives to help new arrivals integrate into the labor market, refugees and asylum seekers face real hurdles getting jobs at their skill level. Among the barriers: Most newcomers speak little or no German and language courses are vastly oversubscribed and often prioritize groups who stand a good chance … Continue reading

International Students in Canadian Universities – Slightly higher than the OECD average

Relative to other countries, in the 2012-2013 school year Canada ranked slightly higher than the OECD average for international students as a proportion of all students for all three levels of study (see Chart 2). In relation to other primarily English speaking countries, Canada has hosted a lower proportion of international students than Australia, the … Continue reading

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