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The future of Work – Adaptability is the key

One clear lesson arises from our analysis: adaptability – in organisations, individuals and society – is essential for navigating the changes ahead. It’s impossible to predict exactly the skills that will be needed even ve years from now, so workers and organisations need to be ready to adapt – in each of the worlds we … Continue reading

The Future of Work – A framework for understanding 

What are the components that collectively constitute “the future of work”? Perhaps the logical place to begin is with the forces that are driving these changes (figure 1). Based on our experience and research, we have identified three forces that are shaping the nature of future work and the future workforce: Technology. Technological advances—for example, … Continue reading

The four faces of the alternative workforce

Some companies already recognize the challenges of maintaining a consistent culture across locations and extending it to people in alternative workforce arrangements. Consider the challenge that Snap Inc., the parent of Snapchat, acknowledged when it filed its IPO. Snap Inc. broke the Silicon Valley mold by launching its IPO without a designated corporate headquarters. In … Continue reading

Diversity and Inclusion – 71 percent of surveyed organizations aspire to have an inclusive culture

As organizations face shifts in globalization, employee expectations, and the competitive landscape, the topic of diversity and inclusion is becoming increasingly critical. Our latest research found that 71 percent of surveyed organizations aspire to have an inclusive culture, but only 12 percent have achieved this objective. Organizations should find new ways of thinking about diversity … Continue reading

The Shifting Skills Gap – A sudden 24% year-over-year decrease in the number of executives who believe it is real

  Last year, a whopping 80% of the C-Suite believed the skills gap—a lack of essential work skills and abilities in the workforce—was real. The gap was widest when it came to so-called soft skills like critical thinking and problem solving (41%), closely followed by hard technical skills associated with the job (39%). But this … Continue reading

Zero-Hours Contracts in UK – Around 1.7 million working and another 1.9 million do not provide work

The expression “zero-hours contract” is a colloquial term for a contract of service under which the worker is not guaranteed work and is paid only for work carried out. It generally leads to “a form of working where the worker is not guaranteed any work but has to be available as and when the employer … Continue reading

Australia – A very positive perception of mature age workers by employers

Attracting and retaining an engaged and productive workforce is key to the success of any organisation and, in turn, is critical to a thriving economy. With an ageing Australian population and skills shortages experienced across many industries, it is more important than ever for organisations to encourage experienced workers to remain in the workforce. Whilst … Continue reading

Skills development is key to more inclusive trade

Over recent decades, the global economy has experienced a profound transformation, mostly as a result of the joint forces of trade integration and technological progress, accompanied by important political changes. Increased trade integration has helped to drive economic growth in both high- and low-income economies, lifting millions out of poverty in emerging and developing countries. … Continue reading

Employment policy must address the concerns underlying the populist backlash against globalisation OECD writes

While an expanding majority of OECD countries have finally closed the massive jobs gap that opened during the Great Recession of 2008‑09, people in a number of countries are expressing rising dissatisfaction with core economic policies, including the promotion of international trade and investment. The populist backlash against globalisation challenges the policy advice offered by … Continue reading

National Qualifications Frameworks (NQFs) – A toolkit

Most of the ETF’s 29 partner countries have national qualifications frameworks (NQFs) but these mainly exist only on paper or are only partially implemented. This toolkit examines why countries are blocked and proposes solutions to speed up implementation. We go wider than the NQFs themselves. It is not about NQFs per se, but about qualification … Continue reading

Immigration – The assessment and recognition of foreign qualifications in OECD

Why is the assessment and recognition of foreign qualifications an important issue? OECD-wide, almost two out of three immigrants have obtained their qualifications abroad. At the same time, a substantial body of research shows that immigrants with foreign qualifications face significant barriers to unfolding their skills potential. Highly educated immigrants with foreign qualifications have lower … Continue reading

Gen Z in US – New college graduates wanting to work for large companies

As the first crop of Gen Z talent joins the future workforce, new grads hold traditional work values with a digital spin. For the first time in years, there is an uptick in the number of new college graduates wanting to work for large companies. They are willing to commit and ready to roll up … Continue reading

Grads in US – 51 Percent feel underemployed

Why do new college graduates end up so disillusioned, underemployed and undervalued after a couple years of work? The Accenture Strategy 2016 U.S. College Graduate Employment Study highlights the disparity between new graduate expectations and the reality of the working world, and examines how employers can improve the employee experience to attract and retain top … Continue reading

Grads in UK – A significant difference between their expectations and their experiences

For the second year in a row, the results of the Accenture Strategy UK University Graduate Employment Study highlight a significant difference between the expectations of new university graduates and the experiences of recent graduates. The class of 2016 is entering the workforce with confidence in how they have been prepared and great expectations for … Continue reading

Immigrants Literacy Skills – A gap equivalent to 3.5 years of schooling OECD finds

Immigrants have weaker literacy skills than native-born adults on average and the gap is the equivalent of 3.5 years of schooling. On average, about two-thirds of the difference in literacy proficiency between foreign- born and native-born adults is explained by how well immigrants have mastered the host country’s language and where they acquired their highest … Continue reading

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