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US / What about the 22 percent of young people who drop out of high school?

In the U.S., the percentage of high school graduates by state ranges from 62 percent (Nevada) to 88 percent (Iowa), with an overall average of 78 percent. What about the 22 percent of young people who drop out of high school? What are their prospects?

From a historical perspective, this chart shows the economic impact of dropping out of high school. But that lifetime earning amount of $1,198,447 will surely decline as fewer young people with – or without – high school degrees gain full-time employment.

And this is a problem. If unemployment in the teen population continues to rise, then a key argument to stay in high school to graduation begins to fade, further impacting college graduation rates.

If unemployment in the teen population continues to rise, then key employment skills building experience will decline making employment less likely as they age in to their 20’s. If unemployment in the teen population continues to rise, then a whole host of societal challenges will grow – and none of them positive for people or the economy.

Chosen excerpts by Job Market Monitor

via Unemployment Is a Problem, But Youth Unemployment Is a Crisis.

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