A Closer Look

After the Great Recession : Underemployed and Underpaid

Throughout the Great Recession and the not-so-great recovery, the most commonly discussed measure of misery has been unemployment. But many middle-class and working-class people who are fortunate enough to have work are struggling as well, which is why Sherry Woods, a 59-year-old van driver from Atlanta, found herself standing in line at a jobs fair this month, with her résumé tucked inside a Bible…

These are anxious days for American workers. Many, like Ms. Woods, are underemployed. Others find pay that is simply not keeping up with their expenses: adjusted for inflation, the median hourly wage was lower in 2011 than it was a decade earlier, according to data from a forthcoming book by the Economic Policy Institute, “The State of Working America, 12th Edition.” Good benefits are harder to come by, and people are staying longer in jobs that they want to leave, afraid that they will not be able to find something better. Only 2.1 million people quit their jobs in March, down from the 2.9 million people who quit in December 2007, the first month of the recession.

“Unfortunately, the wage problems brought on by the recession pile on top of a three-decade stagnation of wages for low- and middle-wage workers,” said Lawrence Mishel, the president of the Economic Policy Institute, a research group in Washington that studies the labor market. “In the aftermath of the financial crisis, there has been persistent high unemployment as households reduced debt and scaled back purchases. The consequence for wages has been substantially slower growth across the board, including white-collar and college-educated workers.”…

Link:

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2012/06/19/us/many-american-workers-are-underemployed-and-underpaid.xml?single=1

Discussion

10 thoughts on “After the Great Recession : Underemployed and Underpaid

  1. Matchless topic, it is very interesting to me )))) tHANKS jobmarketmonitor.com tEAM

    Posted by Appliances repair OC | June 19, 2012, 11:39 pm
  2. Greate post. Keep posting such kind of info on your
    site. Im really impressed by your site.
    Hey there, You’ve done an incredible job. I will certainly digg it and individually recommend to my friends. I am sure they’ll be benefited from this website.

    Posted by promdressescity.com | June 28, 2012, 4:18 am

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Pingback: WE THE PEOPLE MUST TAKE OUR COUNTRY BACK FROM THE LIAR AND THIEF! « Mitt Romney an American for President 2012 - June 19, 2012

  2. Pingback: Small Life, Slow Life: Overworked? Underpaid? You’re Not Alone. {Link} « small life, slow life - June 26, 2012

  3. Pingback: Will the 15-hour week come as a consequence of unemployment ? « Global Job Gap, Local Skills Gap - June 27, 2012

  4. Pingback: US – Management of the Financial Crisis has given weakest recovery of any in the world since 1970 « Job Market Monitor - August 2, 2012

  5. Pingback: Book – Sabotage: How the Republican Party Crippled America’s Economic Recovery « Job Market Monitor - August 6, 2012

  6. Pingback: US – Hilda Solis – No Community Has Suffered More in Recession Than Latino Construction Workers « Job Market Monitor - August 13, 2012

  7. Pingback: US – Not reallocating labor resources since the Great Recession | Job Market Monitor - April 29, 2014

  8. Pingback: Underemployment – A negative impact on future pay research finds | Job Market Monitor - March 31, 2016

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Jobs – Offres d’emploi – US & Canada (Eng. & Fr.)

The Most Popular Job Search Tools

Even More Objectives Statements to customize

Cover Letters – Tools, Tips and Free Cover Letter Templates for Microsoft Office

Follow Job Market Monitor on WordPress.com

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Follow Job Market Monitor via Twitter

Categories

Archives

%d bloggers like this: