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Women in the US Labor Force – A new databook by the BLS

In 2012, 57.7 percent of women were in the labor force, down 0.4 percentage point from 2011. Men’s labor force participation, which always has been much higher than that for women, also edged down in 2012, from 70.5 percent to 70.2 percent. (See tables 1 and 2.)

The overall unemployment rate for women in 2012 was 7.9 percent, compared with 8.2 percent for men. Both figures were down from 2011. Women’s jobless rates varied by race and ethnicity. Asian women had the lowest rate (6.1 percent), followed by White (7.0 percent), Hispanic (10.9 percent), and Black (12.8 percent) women. (See table 3.)

Labor force participation varies by marital status and differs between women and men. Among women, divorced women had the highest labor force participation rate, 66.0 percent. The rate for married women was 59.5 percent. For men, those who were married had the highest labor force participation, 74.6 percent. Divorced men had a labor force participation rate of 68.4 percent. (See table 4.)

Among mothers, the labor force participation rate was higher for those with children 6 to 17 years old than for those with younger children. In 2012, the rate for mothers with children 6 to 17 years old was 76.0 percent. The rate for those with children under 6 years old was 64.7 percent, and the rate for mothers with children under 3 years old was lower, at 60.7 percent. (See table 5; data were collected in the 2012 Annual Social and Economic Supplement to the CPS.)

Unmarried mothers have higher labor force participation rates than married mothers. In March 2012, 75.8 percent of unmarried mothers with children under 18 years old were in the labor force, compared with 68.5 percent of married mothers with children in that age range. (See table 6; data were collected in the 2012 Annual Social and Economic Supplement to the CPS.)

The labor force participation rate of all mothers with children under 18 years of age was 70.9 percent in March 2012, unchanged from a year earlier. (See tables 6 and 7; data were collected in the 2012 Annual Social and Economic Supplement to the CPS.)


 

This report presents historical and recent labor force and earnings data for women and men from the Current Population Survey (CPS), a national monthly survey of approximately 60,000 households conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Unless otherwise noted, data are annual averages from the CPS. (For a detailed description of the source of the data and an explanation of concepts and definitions used, see the Technical Notes at the end of this report.)

Capture d’écran 2015-06-05 à 07.21.07

Chosen excerpts by Job Market Monitor. Read the whole story at  Women in the Labor Force: A Databook

 

 

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