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High school graduation in US – Rate could hit 90 percent (1.7 million more students received diplomas)

The high school graduation rate has topped 80 percent for the first time in U.S. history — and if states can keep up their rapid pace of improvement, the rate could hit 90 percent by 2020, according to federal data released Monday. Capture d’écran 2014-04-29 à 08.29.18

The improvement has been driven by steep gains among African-American and Hispanic students and by progress in shutting down hundreds of troubled urban schools dubbed “dropout factories.” And it’s not confined to one region of the country. Rural states such as Iowa, Vermont and Nebraska are among the best at keeping kids in school until graduation — but other top performers include Texas, Tennessee and Missouri, all of which serve large numbers of low-income students in densely populated cities.

The practical result: Over the past decade, 1.7 million more students received diplomas than would have been expected if graduation rates had remained flat.

Chosen excerpts by Job Market Monitor. Read the whole story at High school graduation rate could hit 90 percent – Stephanie Simon – POLITICO.com.

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