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US / A lot of new jobs are low-pay or part-time – Business news – Boston.com

The 162,000 jobs the economy added in July were a disappointment. The quality of the jobs was even worse.

A disproportionate number of the added jobs were part-time or low-paying — or both.

Part-time work accounted for more than 65 percent of the positions employers added in July. Low-paying retailers, restaurants and bars supplied more than half July’s job gain.

‘‘You’re getting jobs added, but they might not be the best-quality job,’’ says John Canally, an economist with LPL Financial in Boston.

So far this year, low-paying industries have provided 61 percent of the nation’s job growth, even though these industries represent just 39 percent of overall U.S. jobs, according to Labor Department numbers analyzed by Moody’s Analytics. Mid-paying industries have contributed just 22 percent of this year’s job gain.

‘‘The jobs that are being created are not generating much income,’’ Steven Ricchiuto, chief economist at Mizuho Securities USA, wrote in a note to clients.

Chosen excerpts by Job Market Monitor. Read the whole story at 

Boston.com

via New jobs disproportionately low-pay or part-time – Business news – Boston.com.

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