Report

What skills do we need for the future? It depends

Right now, upskilling your workforce is a matter of survival.

Massive workforce shifts in 2020 have forced countless workers to refresh their current skills — and build new ones. If you’re wondering what skills are critical to you moving into 2021, it depends entirely on who you are, where you work, and what you do.

We’ve organized the following data by your country, industry, and job role to help you identify where skills are most at-risk of becoming obsolete. Our aim is to help workers, team managers, and business leaders focus their limited energy and investments on developing the most urgent skills.

Among the 5,000+ workers, team managers, and business leaders we surveyed, demand is strongest for technological skills. However, they’re also looking to develop their social and cognitive skills.

Supply and demand for skills

Everyone -business executives, HR, talent and learning leaders, people managers, and individual workers -seems to be asking the same question right now: “What skills do we need for the future?” The answer is, “it depends.” It depends on who you are, where you work, and what you do.

Chosen excerpts by Job Market Monitor. Read the whole story @ State of Skills 2021 | Degreed

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