Academic Literature

This category contains 237 posts

Canada – Cumulative earnings varied considerably—both across and within fields of study StatCan finds

A new study that followed men and women over two decades found that . Using longitudinal tax data linked to 1991 Census data, the study tracked individuals from 1991, when they were 26 to 35 years old, to 2010, when they were 45 to 54 years old. Individuals were grouped according to their highest level of completed education and major field of study reported in 1991. The labour … Continue reading

China – An increase in the minimum wage leads to a small decline in employment research finds

Our study is the first to use data on minimum wage changes for over 2400 counties in China. We combine the information on minimum wages changes with employment data from the Annual Survey of Industrial Firms, which covers over 70 percent of China’s manufacturing employment. While China instituted a minimum wage system in 1994, enforcement … Continue reading

Monetary policy and inequality in the US – The links

Possible channels linking monetary policy and inequality  Proponents of this view focus on two channels through which monetary policy affects inequality. Heterogeneity in income sources While most households rely predominantly on labour incomes, for others financial income, business income, or transfers may be more important. If expansionary policy raises profits by more than wages, wealth … Continue reading

UK – Long-term unemployed shouldn’t be treated as a different category when assessing the level of slack in the labour market research finds

The extent of labor market slack in the UK economy is an ongoing question given the recent unexpectedly rapid fall in the unemployment rate. In the latest data release for February–April, which is referred to as March 2014, it was 6.6 percent, down from 7.9 percent in May 2010 and 7.8 percent in March 2013. … Continue reading

Inequality in US – The average greenhouse gas footprint of the top 2% of the income distribution is more than four times that of those in the bottom quintile

This paper describes the creation of a database providing estimated greenhouse gas (GHG) footprints for 6 million US households over the period 2008-2012. The database allows analysis of footprints for 52 types of consumption (e.g. electricity, gasoline, apparel, beef, air travel, etc.) within and across geographic regions as small as individual census tracts. Potential research … Continue reading

Individual Character and Social Policy – Help people become more resilient, conscientious or prudent

Policies that ignore char­acter and behavior have produced dis­appointing results. If you can’t help people become more res­ilient, cons­cientious or prudent, then all the cash trans­fers in the world will not produce per­manent benefits.  Nearly every parent on earth operates on the assumption that character matters a lot to the life outcomes of their children. … Continue reading

Overweight women – More likely to work in lower-paying and more physically demanding jobs study finds

Overweight women are more likely to work in lower-paying and more physically demanding jobs; less likely to get higher-wage positions that include interaction with the public; and make less money in either case compared to average size women and all men, according to a new Vanderbilt study. “Starting when a woman becomes overweight, she is … Continue reading

35 Years Of Unemployment Benefits In US – Extended benefits unemployment rate by about one-third percentage point in the most recent recession

During the 2008-2009 recession, U.S. unemployment insurance (UI) benefits were extended to unprecedented levels, with UI duration increasing from 26 weeks—the regular duration—to as much as 99 weeks in some states, prompting a lively debate in policy and academic circles about the adverse effects of such extensions on the search behavior of job seekers and … Continue reading

Hours of Work in US – 32% Work 45 or more hours compared with 18% in Germany, and 4% in France

American employees put in longer workweeks than Europeans. They are also more likely to work at undesirable times, such as nights and weekends. This column argues that the phenomena of long hours and strange hours are related. One possibility for this is cultural – Americans simply enjoy working at strange times. Another, more probable explanation, … Continue reading

Participation in US – Much, but not all, of the decline since 2007 is structural says FED research

Since 2007, the labor force participation rate has fallen from about 66 percent to about 63 percent. The sources of this decline have been widely debated among academics and policymakers, with some arguing that the participation rate is depressed due to weak labor demand while others argue that the decline was inevitable due to structural … Continue reading

CEOs to Unskilled Workers Pay Ratio – Double what you think is ideal research finds

In their recent research, scheduled to be published in a forthcoming issue Perspectives on Psychological Science, Chulalongkorn University’s Sorapop Kiatpongsan and Harvard Business School’s Michael Norton investigate “what size gaps people desire” and whether those gaps are at all consistent among people from different countries and backgrounds. It turns out that most people, regardless of nationality or … Continue reading

US – Job Openings Outpace Hires writes Dallas Fed

In addition to employment and unemployment figures, data on the efficiency of the labor market offer more clues to its health. One way to determine this is to examine the degree of labor mismatch occurring. The classic illustration demonstrating mismatch is the Beveridge curve, which shows an intuitive relationship between the rate of job vacancies … Continue reading

Older Workers Who Lost Their Jobs During The Great Recession In US – Stronger welfare policies would have helped their mental health research finds

The old cliché states, “Money doesn’t make you happy”, but is this really true? In new research, Carlos Riumallo-Herl finds that wealth had an insulating effect against depression for older workers who lost their jobs during the Great Recession in the U.S. He finds that in comparison to workers in the U.S., those in Europe … Continue reading

Job Search in US – It has changed in the aftermath of the Great Recession

The proportion of unemployed individuals who spent some time on an average day searching for a job increased from 20 percent to 24 percent after the recession. However, and perhaps surprisingly, among those unemployed who did search, the average time spent on job search looked very similar in the five years on either side of … Continue reading

US Workforce Investment Act (WIA) – Positive earnings and employment effects for the adult funding stream and mostly negative estimates for the dislocated worker stream research finds

Our examination of the impacts of receiving WIA training rather than solely core and/or intensive services in two anonymous states has yielded a wealth of important findings both substantive and methodological. We find differences in probabilities of training receipt as a function of race, age and education. Substantial unconditional differences by race largely, but not … Continue reading

The Most Popular Job Search Tools

Even More Objectives Statements to customize

Cover Letters – Tools, Tips and Free Cover Letter Templates for Microsoft Office

Follow Job Market Monitor via Twitter

Categories

Archives

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,656 other followers